Tuesday, November 07, 2017

Getting a Stuck Truck out of the Mud

Today, I'm going to share some pro tips about getting a truck out of the mud, if you get stuck.  A few weeks ago, I got my F350 stuck while viewing forestry blocks in northern BC.  It was a Saturday, late afternoon, and I was south of Francois Lake.  I was several hours away from my home office, and away from anyone who could come pull me out.  I wanted to try to get my truck out without assistance, so I didn't have to inconvenience anyone else.  I knew that it would take a while, but I could probably do it by myself.  Since it was almost dark when I got stuck, I slept in the truck overnight, and got started as soon as it started to get light out.

The basic approach that I wanted to use was to jack the truck up, build a corduroy road underneath, and drive to safe ground across a bridge of logs.

To be clear, I didn't expect that I'd get stuck.  This is what the road looked like:




After a quick walk for about twenty feet, to make sure it was safe, I started to drive down it.  It was quite solid.  The temperature was slightly below freezing, so the road was actually frozen.  Or so I thought.  There was a slight downhill grade as I was driving down this spur.  After about 200 feet, I got a bad feeling, and decided to back up.  This is where things went badly.  As soon as I tried to reverse, the truck suddenly broke through the frozen upper layer, and into soft sandy muck underneath.  I immediately stopped moving, to assess the situation.  The very worst thing that you can do when you first get stuck is to spin your wheels, and dig your truck in a lot more deeply.

After a visual assessment, I decided that I'd only dig myself in if I kept trying to back out, up the shallow grade.  But I thought it looked like I could probably go forward, and get the truck wheels back "up" onto solid ground.  I gave it a shot, and was successful.  The truck was no longer "stuck" per se.  I just couldn't back out of that road.  I walked ahead to see if there was a turnaround point.  Unfortunately, when I went a few hundred meters further down the road, around a corner, it turned into soup.  There was no way that I'd be able to turn around anywhere on the road, because it was all too narrow.  And if I went further down to the soupy section, the truck would probably be stuck there until next spring.  I knew that my only option was to somehow back out of there, but that wasn't possible with the large ruts in the road.

Here's where I got stuck when I first started to back up:

 


Luckily, that's where I was able to move forward so my truck was at least sitting on the road.  The ruts that you see up ahead (at the top of the photo) came later, the following morning, after I did some strategic manoeuvring.

So let's take a look at what the truck looked like the next morning, before I started to lay down very much of my corduroy road:






I guess that I didn't take a good photo of the front left wheel, but after I had done some manoeuvring in the morning, it was in a bit of a dip, while the other three wheels were pretty good.




My first task was to get all four wheels up onto something solid, above the road surface.  Corduroy refers to a series of logs or sticks or planks which are more solid than the road surface below.  The pressure of the wheels puts pressure downward on the corduroy, but that pressure is then distributed and spread out throughout all of the piece of wood, instead of solely on the ground directly under the tire.  A corduroy road is a great solution for getting through some really muddy areas.  Heavy equipment often builds corduroy bridges in really swampy areas or ephemeral stream areas.

Most of the wood that I was going to use was about six inches in diameter, so I knew that it would be hard for the truck to climb up onto these slippery logs without tire chains.  I knew that I had to use very small pieces (about two inch diameter) at the start, to allow the wheels to "ramp up" to climbing onto the bigger wood.


 


As you can see, my goal was to move forward up onto the small pieces, and then climb onto larger logs, as the first step of getting the truck up high enough off the muddy road surface, before building the proper log corduroy road.  Oh wait, here's a photo of that front left wheel, the one that was the biggest problem.  As long as I could drive up onto the wood here, the wheel (and the rest of the truck) will climb up higher, and there will be a lot more clearance under the rest of the truck.





Let's give it a shot, and see if I can get onto the good logs:








Ok, that's a relief.  Things are looking a lot better now, and all four wheels are on solid wood.  At this point, I need to build a complete corduroy road under the truck, and extending behind the truck.








Great, I'm feeling optimistic.  Now at this point, I know that I need to go backwards about 80 feet to get onto solid ground.  With the logs being about six inch diameter on average, that's 160 logs required to make it to safe ground.  And actually, since I was cutting five foot logs to make it easier to bring them to the truck (I was pulling them off a block a few hundred meters away), I'd need twice as many, so 320 more logs.  It looked like this was going to take all day.

But wait!  I don't need 320 logs.  As long as I have about six feet of logs behind the truck, I can back up five feet, get out, and move the five feet of logs from the front of the truck, and carry them around to the back, and just keep doing this repeatedly, getting five feet closer to safety every ten minutes.  Eventually, I'd have the truck on solid ground again.

Sometimes, when you're working alone in the bush, you have to be especially resourceful.  But with a lot of patience and thinking, there's almost always a chance to solve the problem and drive away.



Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Information for New Replant.ca Forum Members


The following information is for new members of the Forums (message board) on the main Replant.ca website.  If you're reading this page, I'm assuming that you've just registered for an account.  If you haven't, but want to, send me an email with a requested username.


Making Posts

It's important that you make sure you have a check mark in the “keep me logged in” box when you are logging in.  Some users have reported problems with not being able to post if this box isn’t checked when you log in.  And remember to log out when you’re done, especially if you’re at a public computer.



More Detailed Info about the Board

It would also be great if you could skim through the more detailed info at this link:
 http://www.replant.ca/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=64563

That should answer most other questions that you might have, and also addresses issues such as my full set of rules for members, preventing defamation, company postings vs job postings, making avatars, a reminder that there's a "search" function, etc.


Social Media links

If you’re a regular facebook user, you might also want to put a “like” on the Replant.ca page (mostly designed for non-planters, to showcase photos & environmental articles):
 http://facebook.com/replant.ca

If you're currently a planter or potential planter, you might rather join the Replant facebook group, which is designed more for gossip and industry-specific information:

 http://www.facebook.com/groups/replant.ca

If you use Instagram, you'll probably also enjoy the account at http://instagram.com/replant.ca


Inexperienced Planters

Finally, if you're not a planter yet, but you've either just gotten a job OR you're looking for a job, you should bookmark and visit this link:
 http://www.replant.ca/training



Thanks for your interest in the Replant Forums!  As a reminder, here's a link to the main page:




- Jonathan "Scooter" Clark
Site Administrator


Email:  jonathan.scooter.clark@gmail.com


 



Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Tree Planter Training, Learning How To Plant

I've been working on a series of tree planter training modules for the past three years, to replace the videos that I originally put online in 2005.  Those video had been getting thousands of views every year, but they were very low quality.  It was time for an upgrade.

My training series consists of a total of twenty modules.  The first eight videos (which are the focus of a different post) are meant to be watched a couple months before the season starts, by people who are potentially interested in applying for a job as a planter.  Those videos are designed to let you know what you're getting yourself into if you decide to spend a summer in the bush.

The focus of the last twelve videos (the ones in this post) is more specifically related to the process of understanding the characteristics of trees, learning how to actually plant them, meeting quality & density expectations, and all the other "hands-on" stuff that you'll be expected to know as soon as you strap your bags on.  Although this series was produced in British Columbia, most of the information is also highly relevant to planting in other Canadian provinces (except maybe for the procedures for assessing quality & density).
 




The content in these videos is not targeted solely at inexperienced job applicants.  I'm 100% confident that all current experienced planters will find things in these videos that they didn't know.  You may wonder why I feel bold enough to make this claim?  Simple: because I learned hundreds of new things myself while putting all of this training material together.

These twelve videos are about four hours and twenty minutes in total length, so you'll need to set aside an entire afternoon or evening to watch them.  I'd suggest that you watch them with a pen and paper, so you can make notes about questions that you can ask recruiters or crew bosses at the companies that you apply to.  You should also bookmark this post, because you may want to come back and watch some of these videos more than once.  If you watch them well in advance of the season and this is your first year, you'll probably want to watch them as a refresher just a day or two before you hit the field.  Several companies are showing these as start-up training material when you first arrive to your new job.

In 2018, I'll be publishing a full hard-copy version of this information, which will be available for purchase from Amazon.  For now, you'll have to make do with the videos or the text that I've posted online.  For more information about this entire training series (including text transcriptions), visit:




Without further ado, here are the last twelve videos in the training series.  I hope you find them to be useful.



Basic Silviculture Knowledge
Contents:  Stocking standards, basic seedling physiology, tree structure, shade tolerance, environmental factors affecting growth, basic soils & planting media, seasons.







Stock Handling
Contents:  On-site seedling storage, handling seedling boxes, correct handling of seedlings and bundles.







Common BC Coniferous Trees
Contents:  Pine, spruce, fir, and other important species.







Planning Reforestation Activities
Contents:  The Pre-Work conference, the planting prescription, potential non-planting components, block boundaries, mixing species.







Planting Gear
Contents:  Planting bags, your shovel, miscellaneous planting gear, gear demonstration, non-planting gear.







Planting A Seedling
Contents:  Selecting the best microsite, microsite preparation, opening the hole & grabbing the seedling, planting the tree & closing the hole, planting demonstration.







Meeting Quality Requirements
Contents:  FS 704 system overview, throwing plots, specific faults, damage to seedlings, microsite selection, planting quality.







Spacing, Density, & Excess
Contents:  What's in a plot, plotted versus planted density, target spacing and minimum spacing, excess, missed spots (a quality fault), penalties.








Site Preparation
Contents:  Untreated (raw) ground, trenching, mounding, scrapes, windrows, drag scarification, chemical scarification, prescribed burning, selective harvesting, assessing a block.








Maximizing Productivity
Contents:  Staying organized, efficient planting techniques, efficient work strategies, staying focused.








Behaviours & Attitudes
Contents:  Maintaining the health of the ecosystem, responsible behaviour, safe behaviour, respectful behaviour, treatment of co-workers, stashing.








Wrap-Up
Contents:  Field practice, career options, final advice.





Here are some additional links and resources that might be of interest to potential planters:

Getting a Job:  replant.ca/jobs
Photo Galleries:  replant.ca/photos
Planting Books:  replant.ca/books
Message Board:  replant.ca/phpBB3
Instagram:  instagram.com/replant.ca


Regardless of whether you're a first-time or experienced planter, if you're applying for work at a new company, use the following list of questions to help determine if that employer would be a good fit:
 www.replant.ca/docs/Questions_To_Ask_A_Potential_Employer.pdf

If you're trying to figure out what you'll need for gear, here's a PDF that might help:
 www.replant.ca/docs/equipment_list.pdf


Ok, I think that's the main stuff for now.  You may wonder why I'm offering all of this stuff for free?  You may think, "what does he want in return?"  Well, that's a good question, because I actually DO want something in return:  I want you all to share this with as many other potential planters as you can.

- Jonathan "Scooter" Clark 
www.Replant.ca


PS:  Here's a link to the other blog post which outlines the first eight videos in this series, the "Pre-Season Overview" videos:



PPS:  If you'd like to have access to transcriptions of the video contents, you can find them in all the posts in this forum:

 


  




PS:  Many thanks to the WFCA (Western Forestry Contractors' Association) which helped get this project started several years ago, through a grant from the BC government.  Here is the WFCA's website link:





Saturday, February 11, 2017

Tree Planter Training, Pre-Season Overview

I've been working on a series of tree planter training modules for the past three years, to replace the videos that I originally put online in 2005.  Those video had been getting thousands of views every year, but they were very low quality.  I finally feel that the content of the current series is at a sufficient quality level that I now feel comfortable sharing these with our entire industry.

The training consists of twenty modules altogether.  The first eight (which are the focus of this post) are meant to be watched a couple months before the season starts, by people who are potentially interested in applying for a job as a planter.  If you're looking for the last twelve videos, which focus more on the hands-on aspects of the job, go to this link.
 
These videos will help you understand what you're getting yourself into!  This is NOT an easy job.  The number of first-year planters who try the job for a few days or weeks and then quit is pretty high.  If you're not going to enjoy the work, it's better that you make that decision before you start planting, rather than after you've spent a few thousand dollars on buying equipment and traveling to your first work site.






The content in these videos is not targeted solely at inexperienced job applicants.  I'm 100% confident that all current experienced planters will find things in these videos that they didn't know.  You may wonder why I feel bold enough to make this claim?  Simple: because I learned hundreds of new things myself while putting all of this training material together.

I highly recommend that if you're thinking about planting, you watch these videos very carefully before you commit to accepting a position at a planting company.  These eight videos are just slightly under four hours in total length, so you'll need to set aside an entire afternoon or evening to watch them.  I'd suggest that you watch them with a pen and paper, so you can make notes about questions that you can ask recruiters or crew bosses at the companies that you apply to.  You should also bookmark this post, because you may want to come back and watch some of these videos more than once.

In 2018, I'll be publishing a full hard-copy version of this information, which will be available for purchase from Amazon.  For now, you'll have to make do with the videos or the text that I've posted online.  For more information about this entire training series, visit:




Here are the first eight videos in the training series.  I hope you find them to be useful.  I think I would have made about five thousand dollars more in my first season if I had known all of this information before I started planting.  Crew bosses take note ... you should share this information with everyone on your crews.




Introduction, History of Tree Planting
Contents:  A history of BC's Tree Planting Industry, the modern BC Tree Planting industry.







Why Do We Plant Trees?  What Makes A Good/Bad Planter?
Contents:  Overview of forest management in BC, administration of logging & reforestation, people who should go planting, people who should not go planting, some common myths about planters.







Long-Term Worker Health, & Nutrition
Contents:  Water/hydration, alcohol/drugs/tobacco, fitness & avoiding injuries, personal protective equipment, minimizing the risk of illness, mental health.







Working Safely from Day to Day, Understanding Hazards
Contents:  Assessing risk, personal protective equipment, vehicles, natural worksite hazards, weather, chemicals in the workplace, wildfires, bears, other large animals, insects, miscellaneous, industry-certified training courses.







Rules & Regulations that Protect the Worker
Contents:  Employment Standards Act, Workers' Compensation Act, Canada Human Rights Act, minimum camp standards, complying with client/licensee policies, employer policies, camp-specific or crew-specific policies, corporate organization.







What It's Like to Live in a Tree Planting Bush Camp
Contents:  Overview of basic structure, the daily routine, your cooks & meals, other equipment, when you're not in a tent camp.







Map Reading and GPS Systems
Contents:  GPS systems, other map features, understanding scales, geo-referenced digital maps, always know where you are.







Nature & the Environment
Contents:  Weather, determining direction from the sun, plants, animals, birds.





Here are some additional links and resources that might be of interest to potential planters:

Getting a Job:  replant.ca/jobs
Photo Galleries:  replant.ca/photos
Planting Books:  replant.ca/books
Message Board:  replant.ca/phpBB3
Instagram:  instagram.com/replant.ca


Regardless of whether you're a first-time or experienced planter, if you're applying for work at a new company, use the following list of questions to help determine if that employer would be a good fit:
 www.replant.ca/docs/Questions_To_Ask_A_Potential_Employer.pdf

If you're trying to figure out what you'll need for gear, here's a PDF that might help:
 www.replant.ca/docs/equipment_list.pdf


Ok, I think that's the main stuff for now.  You may wonder why I'm offering all of this stuff for free?  You may think, "what does he want in return?"  Well, that's a good question, because I actually DO want something in return:  I want you all to share this with as many other potential planters as you can.  Make sure they have the opportunity to get a full understanding of what they're getting themselves into, BEFORE they put their first tree in the ground.  If someone isn't suited for tree planting, it's much better that they "quit" before they start, instead of three or four days into the season.

 Here's a link to the post which last the last twelve videos in my tree planter training series:

http://jonathan-scooter-clark.blogspot.com/2017/02/tree-planter-training-learning-how-to.html  

Oh, and by the way, keep this in mindI don't like to get my cameras wet.  Almost all of the photos and videos in these tutorials look all sunny and happy.  It's a facade.  We live in a world of mud, rain, and misery.

- Jonathan "Scooter" Clark
 www.Replant.ca


PS:  If you'd like to have access to transcriptions of the video contents, you can find them in all the posts in this forum:


  






Also, after watching all the videos, you'll probably be sick of the background song.  But if not, and if you want to hear (or download) the entire song, here's a SoundCloud link:









PS:  Many thanks to the WFCA (Western Forestry Contractors' Association) which helped get this project started several years ago, through a grant from the BC government.  Here is the WFCA's website link:


Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Canadian Tree Planting Books

I thought I'd make a page here to summarize some of the books that have been written about Tree Planting in Canada.  Hopefully I'll be adding a few of my own to this page eventually!  A handful of the books at the bottom of this list aren't actually about tree planting, but they're either related to west coast forestry, or they're handy books for any tree planters who are trying to improve their species identification skills.



Title:  Eating Dirt
Author:  Charlotte Gill
Published:  2011
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12464152-eating-dirt







Title:  Six Million Trees
Author:  Kristel Derkowski
Published:  2016
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29613245-six-million-trees







Title:  Handmade Forests
Author:  Helene Cyr
Published:  1998
Link:  https://www.amazon.ca/Handmade-Forests-Treeplanters-Helene-Cyr/dp/0865713936
(This one is fairly hard to get now, although you can find used copies from Amazon resellers).







Title:  Whatever It Takes
Author:  Nick Kaminski
Published:  2006
Link:  https://www.amazon.com/Whatever-Journey-Through-Canadian-Wilderness/dp/097805010X
(Quite hard to find, not currently available online: I have one of the only two copies that I know of).







Title:  Pounders
Author:  Josh Barkey
Published:  2016
Link:  https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32507730-pounders







Title:  We Will All Be Trees
Author:  Josh Massey
Published:  2010
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7264802-we-will-all-be-trees#bookDetails
(The only science fiction book here about tree planting).







Title:  The Book Of Tree Planter Suicides
Author:  Toby Pikelin
Published:  2013
Link:  https://issuu.com/efterblivet/docs/btps_online_book_pdf
(This is a free one, just check out the link!).







Title:  Empire Of The Beetle
Author:  Andrew Nikiforuk
Published:  2011
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11066432-empire-of-the-beetle
(Not about planting, but close enough, and a fascinating read).







Title:  The Golden Spruce
Author:  John Vaillant
Published:  2006
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/88335.The_Golden_Spruce
(Not about planting, but a lot of planters have really enjoyed this one).







Title:  Plants of Northern British Columbia
Authors:  MacKinnon, Pojar, & Coupe
Published:  1941 (revised since then)
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2063430.Plants_of_Northern_British_Columbia
(Not about planting, but a great species identification guide for northern BC).







Title:  Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia
Authors:  Parish, Coupe, & Lloyd
Published:  1996
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/530070.Plants_of_Southern_Interior_British_Columbia_and_the_Inland_Northwest
(Not about planting, but a great species identification guide for southern BC).







Title:  Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast
Authors:  Pojar & MacKinnon
Published:  1994
Link:  http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/606055.Plants_of_the_Pacific_Northwest_Coast
(Not about planting, but a great species identification guide for the coast).






For more information about tree planting in Canada, visit:

www.Replant.ca



Monday, January 09, 2017

Potential Bumper Sticker Designs

I'm considering printing some bumper stickers.  I did this once in the past, almost ten years ago, but at the time, bumper sticker technology was a lot more primitive.  The original ones were pretty boring, just green letters on a white background.

I was playing around with some potential designs this afternoon, and came up with three so far.  Let me know which one you think is best?


CHOICE 1:  TREE IN LAKE




CHOICE 2:  YELLOW FIELD BLUE SKY




CHOICE 3:  DECIDUOUS SEEDLING IN HAND


Sunday, January 08, 2017

Sharon Moalem's "Survival Of The Sickest"

I read a lot of books, but I'm not frequently motivated to write a review of these books.  However, I just finished a book that one of my tree planters recommended to me, and I found it to be a great choice.

The book was written by Sharon Moalem, a Canadian doctor with a Ph.D. in human physiology, specializing in neurogenetics and evolutionary medicine.  The book is non-fiction, and is best suited for readers who have at least completed high school biology, or who have a basic understanding of genetics and/or medicine.  But this is far from a textbook.

Rather than going into a traditional style of review, I'm instead going to just list a handful of subjects that the book talks about, in point form.  This alone should be enough to let you know whether or not you might find it to be interesting:

- Many people are familiar with the practice of "bleeding" a patient, which is a practice that happened with the earliest recorded history, and which for some time in the modern era "made no sense."  Well, consider the fact that iron is a critical mineral for human life (I didn't realize how critical until I read this book).  What if there was a disease (there is, called hemochromatosis) in which a person was unable to "use up" the iron in their body, and the amount stored kept growing?  Too much of a good thing is sometimes bad, and this oversupply of iron can happen.  With a lack of other easy ways to remove iron from the blood, "bleeding" a patient sometimes IS a good practice.

- People with hemochromatosis have too much iron in their bodies, as noted above.  But even though their bodies are littered with iron, one important place where this iron doesn't collect is in the white blood cells.  The bubonic plague of the Middle Ages was a bacterial disease in which the infectious agent entered the white blood cells, and the iron in the white cells was an important part of the growth of the infection.  But people with hemochromatosis lucked out.  In many cases, the lack of iron in their microphages protected the human from the disease.

- There's a great section talking about Diabetes and sugar intake (I'll have a lot less sugar in my coffee from now on).  The number of obese children in north America today is staggering, and getting worse.  Many of these children are getting diabetes, as a tie-in to their obesity.  I won't get into the diabetes section in depth, but it taught me a lot about how to should think about certain lifestyle changes.

- The pituitary gland is indirectly responsible for the production of melatonin, which helps prevent skin cancer.  But the pituitary gland gets its information from the optic nerve.  Wearing sunglasses will trick the optic nerve, and affect your melatonin production, which can put you at much higher risk for skin cancer!

- There is a theory that the reason people often sneeze upon exposure to bright sunlight is because when we still lived in caves, if a person sneezed upon coming out of the cave into bright sunlight, the sneeze might dislodge microbes and molds from the nose or upper respiratory tract.  I hadn't heard this theory before.  I actually disagree with it, but it's interesting (my theory is much more basic, namely that a sneeze is intended to possibly help divert your stare when you look at the sun, to avoid damage to your retinas).

- The last ice age ended not over a slow change of a few thousand years, but rather, over an unbelievably rapid global adjustment of just three years!  This has staggering implications upon climate change theory today.  We could mess up our planet far, far more quickly than we currently believe.

- Human females tend to be more likely to conceive males during "good times" and more likely to conceive females during "tough times" (this refers to a very macro scale, as in global conflicts and disasters, not a temporary challenge such as "I broke a coffee mug half an hour before we had sex).

The book also goes into discussions such as:

- Why Asians often have such an intolerance to alcohol.

- Theories on better ways to prevent cholera outbreaks.

- How sunspot activity (and solar radiation) may relate to some past global influenza epidemics and pandemics.

- The relationship of telomerase to the Hayflick Limit to cancer to longevity.

- Why some diseases are passed down directly from woman to granddaughter, rather than woman to daughter (because when a female is conceived, her lifetime supply of eggs is already in her body when she's still a fetus - thus the eggs that produce the next generation were actually carried inside the grandmother's body when the mom was not yet born).



Phew, this post has covered a lot of ground.  Well, if all of the above is of interest to you, then you're going to learn a lot from this book.

Happy reading ...






Follow Jonathan Clark on other sites:
        Twitter: twitter.com/djbolivia
        SoundCloud: soundcloud.com/djbolivia
        YouTube: youtube.com/djbolivia
        Facebook: facebook.com/djbolivia
        Main Site: www.djbolivia.ca
        About.Me: about.me/djbolivia
        Music Blog: djbolivia.blogspot.ca
        MixCloud: mixcloud.com/djbolivia
        DropBox: djbolivia.ca/dropbox



Sunday, April 10, 2016

Hi & Ho, We Plant Trees

Several years ago, Peter Krahn (of Peppermill Records) released a compilation of tree planting songs, written and performed by tree planters, about planting.  He made this available as a free release from Peppermill.  The compilation was titled, "Hi and Ho, We Plant Trees."

I've always been impressed that I've gotten into planting trucks at several different companies and heard songs playing that were on this compilation.  It's been shared widely over the past several years.

With a new Interior planting season about to come upon us, and a new crop of planters about to hit the field, I think it's time that I shared this music again (you can download the songs further below).

Here's the cover art for this album:







Many thanks are due to the individual artists, for making these songs available, and also to Krahn, for putting this project together!

If you want to audit or download individual songs, here are links to all of the songs on SoundcloudIf you want to download any of these songs, click on the download arrow icon near the top right of each widget.

If you want to download the whole album in one shot, here's a link that you can right-click on, and choose the "save target/file/link as" option:


This link is saved as a single RAR archive, which can be uncompressed natively in Windows.  If you're using OS X on a Mac and you're looking for a way to extract/unpack a RAR archive, two free programs are The Unarchiver and UnRarX, both of which can be found with a google search.  The RAR archive file is 163 MB in size, with all of the MP3's from the album.